Curriculum 2019

Policy

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The purpose of this policy document is to describe how curriculum is delivered in 2019 and outline the School’s practice in relation to curriculum-related issues.

1.  West Australian Curriculum requirements

2.  ELC Years Pre-Kindergarten to Pre-Primary

3.  Years 1-2

4.  Years 3-6

5.  Learning Development Centre (Preparatory School)

6.  Extension Programs (Preparatory School)

7.  Peter Moyes Centre (Preparatory School)

8.  Support Classes Years 7 – 10

9.  Extension Classes Years 8 – 10

10.  Mainstream classes Years 7 – 10

11.  Years 11 and 12

12.  Peter Moyes Centre

13.  Learning Development Centre

14.  Profiles Years 7 – 12

15.  Private tutoring

16.  Guidelines regarding teacher allocation or request for change of teacher

17.  Managing Student Behaviour

Appendix A: Preparatory School curriculum overview 2019

Appendix B: Senior School curriculum overview 2019

Appendix C: International exchange program

Appendix D: Guidelines for Teaching Strategies Profiles (TSPs) and Learning Profiles (LPs)

Appendix E: Individual Education Programs (IEPs) in individual subject/s

Appendix F: Year 11 Mathematics: Methods

Appendix G: Students who speak English as an Additional Language or Dialect

1.  West Australian Curriculum requirements

The West Australian Curriculum sets out what each student should be taught in relation to learning areas, general capabilities and cross-curriculum priorities.

The West Australian Curriculum and Assessment Outline states: In accordance with the School Curriculum and Standards Authority Act, 1997, the Western Australian Curriculum and Assessment Outline (Outline) sets out ‘the knowledge, understanding, skills, values and attitudes that students are expected to acquire and guidelines for the assessment of student achievement’. The Principles of Teaching, Learning and Assessment focus on the provision of a school and class environment that is intellectually, socially and physically supportive of learning. This education must be inclusive of students’ individual strengths and needs. Differences in terms of characteristics such as ethnicity, language (linguistic background), culture, gender, socioeconomic status, disability, sexual orientation or geographic location should not be allowed to detract from the student’s access to the high-quality education that is their right.

Curriculum adjustments

These may include:

  • drawing from learning area content at different levels along the Foundation to Year 10 sequence to adjust age-equivalent content (for example, some Year 6 students will be able to plan and conduct a specific investigation making decisions about variables, while others may take part in the same investigation but at a less complex level by exploring and answering questions)
  • drawing from and emphasising specific aspects of one or more of the general capabilities to adjust the learning focus in a particular learning area (for example, teaching targeted literacy or social skills through a science lesson) — although there is greater focus in this instance on the general capabilities, integrity of the learning area must be retained
  • drawing from and emphasising specific aspects of one or more of the cross-curriculum priorities to adjust the learning focus of a particular learning area (for example, providing opportunities to examine historical perspectives from an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander viewpoint).

http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/studentdiversity/meeting-diverse-learning-needs

Christ Church Grammar School is guided by these principles in its Curriculum Policy and the information below sets out how it provides for the diversity of students enrolled.

2.  Early Learning Community (ELC) Pre-Kindergarten to Pre-Primary

At Christ Church Grammar School, we recognise that the establishment of an emotionally secure foundation lays the foundation for all future learning. We place a high priority on the partnership between home and school, believing that strong, reciprocal relationships are essential to the academic, social and emotional wellbeing of our boys.

Our Early Learning Years programs recognise that our boys are capable and competent learners. We understand that young boys need to be immersed in hands-on learning experiences which enable them to explore, question, collaborate, think critically, problem solve, communicate and discover new knowledge. We know that boys learn best when they are actively involved in tasks, when there is rich discussion about what they are doing and when there are regular opportunities to work with others.

We understand the important role of play as a vehicle for learning and are intentional in our provision of a learning environment and program that supports children’s interests and encourages exploration and inquiry through play and experiential learning. We know that learning happens indoors, outdoors and beyond the classroom and prioritise the space, time and opportunity for boys to explore, experiment, take risks and build their dispositions for learning. We are fortunate to have access to the beautiful Swan River which provides an unpredictable, ever changing environment that builds boys who are positive risk takers, self-aware, self-confidence and resilient, all skills required for future academic success.

We facilitate a balanced approach to teaching and learning in the early learning years designed to support the inquisitive learning style of boys. Play based pedagogy is used to engage, motivate and empower boys. Explicit intentional teaching is used to focus on literacy, numeracy and investigation skills. Our inquiry-based emergent curriculum lays the foundation for children to make sense of future learning concepts in ways that are meaningful and relevant to them. Our teachers follow the boys’ interests, intentionally create environments of wonder, support independence and challenge thinking.  They are experts at designing and creating playful, fun, hands-on, authentic experiences for boys, giving them a meaningful and purposeful context to apply and develop skills, grow and learn together.

With relationships, enjoyment and fun significantly influencing how boys learn, Christ Church unlocks each boy’s talents, confidence and happiness by growing a sense of belonging in his class and the wider community.

3. Years 1-2

In Year 1 and 2 we balance explicit teaching of fundamental skills with inquiry-based and cross-curricular learning. We engage the boys with hands-on, real-life experiences where appropriate and focus on all learning experiences a young boy needs to move forward, both academically and emotionally. Curriculum is planned using SCASA documents, which align with the Western Australian curriculum.

Each boy is assessed for learning using formative assessment at the beginning of the school year to identify his individual needs, particularly in the curriculum areas of Mathematics and English. From there, individual learning targets to ensure all boys are receiving instruction on the fundamental skills needed to develop. This instruction is differentiated both in class and through withdrawal lessons provided through the school’s Learning Development Centre and Centre for Excellence. English is taught through a program that includes explicit teaching of synthetic phonics, alongside reading and writing tasks using engaging texts. In this way, the boys experience using the Literacy skills in a purposeful and playful way. Mathematical skills are developed through explicit instruction of core skills using hands-on and concrete materials. There are also opportunities for more play-based, child-led and purpose-based learning experiences that help to consolidate and embed the key learning objectives. Boys are assessed both informally and formally, through formative and summative assessment, to track their progress through their English and Mathematics skills and parents are regularly reported back to where their son sits according to the WA curriculum.

History and Social Sciences, Science, Health and Technologies curriculum are also taught in an integrated and inquiry-led way. Units are developed that allow numerous aspects of these curricular outcomes to be met through playful and purposeful tasks and experiences.

4.  Years 3-6

Students in Years 3-6 engage in a variety of programs designed to engage and stimulate the learner whilst continuing to develop the sense of self. As a Preparatory School, we are guided by the Christ Church Pedagogy whilst adhering to the Western Australian Curriculum. Programs are designed collaboratively, with a variety of resources and technology used, in order to ensure boys are actively engaged, challenged and their individual needs are met. It is in Years 3-6 that we focus on adding to the foundation created in the early years. The boys are engaged in fun and interesting activities, designed to help them thrive in literacy and numeracy. Through programs such as Outdoor Education at Kooringal, the Year 5 Sailing experience and the Year 6 Canberra Tour, boys are able to discover their individuality and become more independent learners. When boys leave the Preparatory School, they have been provided opportunities to further develop their own initiative and leadership skills.

Ongoing assessment throughout the academic year informs Mid Semester and End of Semester Reports. Open Classrooms and Learning journeys take place each term, which provides an opportunity for parents/carers to develop a clear understanding of their son’s progress.

5.  Learning Development Centre (Preparatory School)

The Learning Development Centre at Christ Church Grammar School supports students throughout the Preparatory School that are struggling with their learning. Our goal is to provide best evidenced-based practice in supporting students’ learning needs.

At Christ Church Grammar School, we know that all students have different learning needs and learn at different rates. Our practices are guided by the Response to Intervention (RTI) model. RTI is a multi-tier approach to the identification and support of student learning needs. The process begins with high-quality classroom instruction with universal screening and tracking of all students’ progress. Students who struggle with their learning are provided with interventions at increasing levels of intensity to support their learning. These supports may be provided by a variety of personnel, including classroom teachers, special educators, and specialists. In addition, regular collaboration and communication with parents is maintained when any support program is provided to students.

The RTI model allows for early intervention by providing academic supports rather than waiting for a child to fail before offering help. Early Intervention is the cornerstone of the Learning Development Centre approach. Support is provided to target skill development, and a formal diagnosis is not a prerequisite to access services.

Our programs are consistent with best practice and are underpinned by a strong current evidence-base. A range of explicit programs are delivered to address student learning needs in the areas of Phonological Awareness, Phonics, Spelling, Reading, Comprehension and Mathematics.

Selection for placement in support

Selection for the support class is made independently in each subject, on the basis of the following:

  • Teacher recommendation
  • Achievement in classwork
  • Recommendation from the School Psychologist or the Co-ordinator of Learning Development
  • Parent request
  • Results in standardised testing, e.g. NAPLAN, ACER.

Boys are not placed in support classes on the basis of behavioural issues or lack of effort.

6.  Extension Program (Centre for Excellence, Preparatory School)

Our aim is to cater for every student within a classroom, even when this can be difficult in subject areas where there is a wide range of abilities. In these instances, classrooms are streamed to provide a learning environment that is more tailored to students’ abilities and needs.

Mathematics classes are streamed (Years 3 to 6). This allows teachers to design programs which assess the learning that a student is ready for and provide the learning experiences to support their progress. Maths Extension classes are made available to boys in Years 1 to 6, which aims to allow boys to apply skills learnt to more abstract problem-solving scenarios.

Robotics is a Year 4 program for students of high analytical ability, involving boys working together to design creative solutions for problems.

The strategies to achieving reading success (STARs) program is streamed (Years 2 to 6), which allows for ongoing challenge in ability groups providing an engaging curriculum delivered at an appropriate pace.

 

Philosophy in the Preparatory School is an extension option for Pre-Primary to Year 4 students. It encourages boys to reflect upon a topic or concept, to question and challenge ideas and importantly persevere in their quest to answer a philosophical inquiry.  It teaches boys to be a part of collaborative community of inquiry – to think, to justify their thoughts, to be flexible in making conclusions and learn the etiquette of good conversations.

In Years 5 and 6, boys are selected for Future Problem Solving (FPS), a program for students of high analytical ability, involving boys working together to design creative solutions for problems on a global scale.

Throughout our extension classes across all year groups, the purpose is to cover core content and extend higher order understandings through wide-ranging exploration of topics of interest. The aim is to increase rigour rather than pressure.

In addition to the large range of open-entry co-curricular options, there are also selective co-curricular options available for students with gifts or talents. These include, but are not limited to competitions such as the Da Vinci Decathlon, Have Sum Fun, and Maths and Informatics Olympiads.

Selection for extension classes

Students are selected using a range of measures, such as:

  • classwork and test results
  • results from standardised ability testing such as NAPLAN, ACER and results in similar tests
  • a common assessment task designed to test higher order skills
  • teacher recommendations and observations of behaviours

For a student to be selected, evidence must exist, in some form, that he has the capacity to be successful in the extension program.

7.  Peter Moyes Centre (Preparatory School)

The Peter Moyes Centre (PMC) provides a learning environment for the students attending Christ Church Grammar School who are diagnosed with a range of disabilities. Each boy accessing the PMC has a Documented Plan (DP) and/or a Learning Profile (LP), developed in collaboration with his parents and teachers. The Documented Plan sets goals for the development of all learning areas as well as a range of life skills to encourage independence and confidence. The Learning Profile outlines all individualised strategies and accommodations put in place in the classroom to support the students in reaching success.

The students who find it difficult to access the mainstream curriculum due to their diagnosed disability benefit from one-on-one support from a special education teacher and education assistants. They receive explicit teaching instructions in an environment with limited distractions. This intensive support allows students to reach the goals outlined in their individualised Documented Plan through suitable learning experiences. At the same time, these boys join their mainstream peers for all specialist lessons, extraordinary activities such as sport carnivals and excursions as well as daily social interactions at the beginning of the school day and in the afternoons.

The PMC also offers support in the classroom for those students who have a diagnosis and are able to cope with the demands of a mainstream curriculum, with some additional support. These students participate in all academic subjects in their year group and when needed they receive support in the classroom from an Education Assistant. The PMC staff work collaboratively with the classroom teacher to ensure all adequate strategies and accommodations are put in place and the student responds positively to the intervention.

The PMC is committed to ensuring all students accessing the centre reach the maximum of their learning potential in a positive and stimulating environment. Our philosophy is based on the provision of consistent, individual and functional teaching and learning programs, whilst having high expectations regardless of students’ abilities.

8.  Support classes Years 7 – 10

The School is aware of its responsibility to accommodate the needs of boys who have significantly different learning needs. We are required to be able to demonstrate that students are making progress over time and that they are accommodated if they have a learning difficulty or disability. We further need to demonstrate reasonable adjustments to the curriculum so that these students are not prevented from achieving learning outcomes. We want boys to remain motivated and to achieve success, relative to their own capacity, prior understanding and level of effort.

In the Senior School, the subjects of English, Humanities, Mathematics and Science run support classes to cater for the needs of boys with specific learning challenges, needs or gaps. This policy outlines how the usual curriculum is modified and assessed, as well as how boys are identified and placed in support classes.

Principles

Teachers of support classes are guided by the following principles:

  • Support classes usually contain fewer students than mainstream classes, allowing for more individual attention.
  • The teaching program is meaningfully differentiated for the four support classes. There may be some areas of commonality to the mainstream, where appropriate, but a separate program is produced and distributed to the support classes.
  • The assessment program is also modified to ensure that boys can demonstrate their understandings of the learned material.  They must be able to make a genuine attempt at the majority of the assessment items in each test or assignment and should be able to achieve success, given appropriate effort and motivation. They are marked according to a different scale and their marks and grades are therefore not equivalent to the mainstream marks and grades.  They receive a support grade and a West Australian Curriculum Grade on reports.
  • The focus is on development of skills rather than acquisition of content knowledge. This emphasis on skills allows some students to return to mainstream classes at an appropriate point and undertake an ATAR pathway leading to study at university; other students will take General (non-ATAR) pathway and go on to further study at either university or TAFE or into apprenticeships or the workforce.

Selection for placement in support

Selection for the support class is made independently in each subject, on the basis of the following:

  • Teacher recommendation, guided by discussion with the relevant Assistant/Head of Department
  • Achievement in coursework and tests/examinations
  • Recommendation from the School Psychologist or the Co-ordinator of Learning Development
  • Parent request
  • Results in standardised testing, e.g. NAPLAN, Allwell, ACER.

Boys are not placed in support classes on the basis of behavioural issues or lack of effort.

Notification to parents

Parents will be notified prior to the beginning of the school year, via email, of our intention to place a boy in a support class/es in order for him to access a significantly differentiated curriculum and assessment program. It is our experience that placement in support classes optimises a student’s rate of learning; parents have the right to refuse such placement but they must also be aware that this is likely to compromise their son’s learning. Whilst we understand that parents are sometimes concerned that their son will fall further behind if he is not following the mainstream program, our experience is that he is unlikely to make much progress if the content is beyond him; the effects of constant failure on his motivation and emotional wellbeing can also be detrimental. This may cause unjustifiable hardship for the student.

Movement from the support class into a mainstream class

Teachers of all classes regularly monitor students’ achievement. If a student in a support class demonstrates progress that makes it clear that his understandings and skills have improved to the point where we anticipate that he will be able to continue to make progress in a mainstream class, parents will be contacted and advised of this recommendation. Consequent changes may be made at any point of the school year.

Reporting

The West Australian Curriculum allows the School to report two different achievement grades. We are required to provide one grade calculated according to the WA Achievement Standards; we also choose to provide a School-based support grade, calculated according to our own standards, based upon the curriculum being delivered. The CCGS grade earned in a support class will not be directly comparable to a CCGS mainstream grade.

Support classes are identified as such on reports.

Curriculum Support

Curriculum Support classes take the place of second language classes. They are run in Years 7 and 8 for students who have a documented learning disability and/or who are performing significantly below their peers on standardised assessments. The focus is on the development of literacy and organisational skills that will support their learning in other areas. A boy who undertakes Curriculum Support in Year 7 will continue in that class in Year 8 but in Year 9 an elective may be chosen instead. To be considered for inclusion in a Curriculum Support class, students must also be enrolled in an English support class.

Individual Education Plans – See Appendix D.

Intensive reading programs

These programs are provided for boys in Years 7 and 8 who have already been placed in an English support class, and who have particularly acute literacy needs. The highly structured program focuses on fundamental skills acquisition for a very small number of boys (typically four or five) who are deemed most likely to benefit from it. The class runs in place of another subject. Placement in these classes is offered by the Co-ordinator of Learning Development, in consultation with parents. Parents are kept informed of their son’s progress.

Intensive numeracy program

This program is provided for boys in Year 7 who have already been placed in a Mathematics Support class and who have particularly acute numeracy needs. The program focuses on fundamental skill acquisition for a very small number of boys who are deemed most likely to benefit from it. Placement in this class is offered by the Co-Ordinator of Learning Development, in consultation with the Assistant Director of Studies and parents.

9.  Extension classes Years 7 – 10

In 2019, there is one extension class in English, Mathematics, Humanities and Science in Years 8 – 10.  In 2019, there will be two extension classes in English, Mathematics, Humanities and Science in Year 7. The extension classes follow a significantly modified learning and assessment program.

Selection for extension classes

Students are selected for each subject independently, using a range of measures, such as:

  • course work and test marks
  • NAPLAN, ACER PAT and results in similar tests
  • a common assessment task designed to test higher order skills
  • teacher recommendations and observations of behaviours
  • advice from the Director of the Centre for Excellence
  • results from standardised ability testing, most recent school reports and Year 5 NAPLAN results, in the case of Year 7 extension

For a student to be selected, evidence must exist, in some form, that he has the capacity to be successful in the extension class.

Teaching and learning program

  • The extension classes will follow a modified teaching and learning program, with a modified assessment program.  The amount of modification will vary according to the subject and the needs of the group. The modifications will be documented and made available to the department for future use. Teachers and Heads of Department will ensure that core concepts are covered efficiently, so that time can be spent on work that extends to higher order understandings and wide-ranging exploration of topics of interest. The aim will be to increase rigour rather than pressure. Teachers of Years 9 and 10 will take into account the work covered in the previous year and modify programs accordingly.
  • The program taught is also differentiated in regard to:
    • Content – easier content is removed (this could be revision work) and replaced with more advanced content
    • Process – the method of learning is different; content is moved through at an increased pace and with greater emphasis on higher order thinking
    • Product – learning activities and assessments are changed to reflect the content and outcomes of the course.
  • Teachers have the opportunity to undertake professional development to ensure that they are familiar with the characteristics of gifted and talented students.

Assessment program

  • The extension classes will follow an assessment program that is a modified version of the mainstream program. Some assessments may remain the same; some may be very similar but use more difficult texts and/or provoke higher expectations of responses; and some assessments may be removed or replaced.
  • Students in extension classes are expected to maintain academic achievement and commitment to the extension course. Students may be moved from the extension class to a mainstream class if there are significant concerns; this decision will be made by the Head of Department, in consultation with the parents, Head of House and tutor.
  • Students from a mainstream class may be moved into an extension class, should a place become available.  Parents would be consulted before such a move.
  • The grade received will be an ‘extension class’ grade, which will be calculated differently to the grades in mainstream classes.  The subject prize will be awarded to a member of the extension class.

Reporting

  • The West Australian Curriculum allows the School to report two different achievement grades. We are required to provide one grade calculated according to the WA Achievement Standards; we also choose to provide a School-based grade, calculated according to our own standards based upon the curriculum being delivered. The CCGS grade earned in an extension class will not be directly comparable to a CCGS mainstream grade.
  • Extension classes will be identified as such on reports.

Notification to parents

  • Parents will be notified prior to the beginning of the school year, via the notices in CCGS World, of the notation for extension classes on a boy’s timetable. For Year 7 extension in 2019, parents will be notified via email if their son is selected for extension classes.

10.  Mainstream classes Years 7 – 10

Students not placed in support or extension are mixed through the remaining classes; there is no hierarchy in the numbers attached to each class. The pace of learning and nature of content will be appropriate for boys placed in these mainstream classes.  Content in mainstream classes is differentiated to extend able students and support those experiencing difficulty.

In Year 10 Mathematics, the West Australian Curriculum offers two courses: one course is at a standard level and the other is at an advanced level. Parents will be advised of their son’s placement before the commencement of Year 10 and can discuss any issues with the Head of Mathematics. Both courses prepare students for ATAR subjects in Years 11 and 12, with the advanced course being specifically for students who intend to choose ATAR Mathematics Methods and Specialist in Years 11 and 12.

11.  Years 11 and 12

In Years 11 and 12, students may undertake study in an ATAR or a non-ATAR Pathway. Students on a non-ATAR Pathway are required to study six subjects in Years 11 and 12, including both English and Mathematics, and may also elect to complete a certificate course before the end of Year 12.

12.  Peter Moyes Centre

The Peter Moyes Centre caters for boys with professionally diagnosed disabilities/disorders who require moderate to significant adjustments to their educational program, as detailed in a Needs Assessment Summary (NAS). A Documented Plan (DP) is written for each student, outlining specific learning targets and objectives. The primary focus is on the development of their literacy, numeracy, socio-emotional and independent living skills. Based on the West Australian Curriculum, the DP is reviewed regularly by PMC staff and relevant members of the school community with input from parents; each boy’s needs are considered individually and integration into mainstream elective and core subjects is available to boys who are assessed as likely to benefit from, and have the ability to cope with, such classes.

13.  Learning Development Centre

The Learning Development Centre caters for boys who can engage with mainstream age-appropriate curriculum, given additional support, as detailed in Section 2 above. It also provides the Curriculum Support program (substitute for Language study) as detailed above.

14.  Profiles Years 7 – 12

The Coordinator of the Learning Development Centre has responsibility for preparing, in consultation with the School Psychologists:

  • Teaching Strategies Profiles detailing appropriate strategies for students who have particular learning needs
  • Learning Profiles, including special provisions for assessments and examinations, for students with a documented disability.

These confidential profiles are uploaded onto the School database and all teachers and the relevant tutor and Head of House have a responsibility to be cognisant of the contents and make reasonable accommodation for these students. The Co-ordinator of Learning Development will ensure that parents are provided with a copy of the profile.

Parents, teachers and tutors can request testing for boys (with parental permission), through Heads of House, as concerns become apparent. Newly created profiles are emailed directly to parents, teachers, Head of House and tutor and uploaded to Docman on Synergetic. See Appendix C below for further information.

15.  Private tutoring

Christ Church does not permit its teaching or support staff to tutor students enrolled at Christ Church Grammar School, be they day students or boarders, in any learning area, for any form of monetary remuneration or similar gain. Heads of Department may liaise with colleagues in other schools to establish a list of external tutors to which students may be referred. This arrangement also allows Christ Church Grammar School staff to be listed as external tutors in other schools.

When parents are referred to external tutors, it is on the understanding that the School is providing a contact only; the onus is on the parent to establish the external tutor’s suitability and credentials. Teachers must not be requested to liaise directly with external tutors at any stage; it is the external tutor’s responsibility to evaluate the student’s needs and to use documentation provided by the School (such as programs, assessment rubrics) to assist the student’s learning and progress. Parents should note that inexperienced tutors often feel that they are helping if they complete work for the student but this is totally counter-productive and the student runs the risk of losing marks for submitting work that is not his own.

16.   Teacher allocation or request for change of teacher

It is not the School’s practice to solicit or accede to requests for specific teachers.  However, should a boy be allocated to the same teacher for a third year, the Studies Office will endeavour to re-locate him. This will depend on the availability of other teachers, which may be limited in some specialist areas.

17.  Managing Student Behaviour

Teachers are supported by a set of guidelines for the management of student behaviour in the classroom. This model is concerned with the maintenance of a positive and safe learning environment for all students.

It is the CCGS classroom teacher’s responsibility to establish clear behavioural expectations for their students. Explicitly stated classroom expectations should be used as a reference point for managing student behaviour. The following rights and responsibilities are a framework for classroom teachers in establishing their own classroom expectations for their students.

Rights and responsibilities of all members of the CCGS community

Rights Responsibilities
To be treated with respect Treat others and oneself with respect
To be treated without discrimination To respect individual differences
To learn and explore ideas To be ready to learn and allow others to learn
To be safe To encourage cooperation and inclusive behaviours
To be heard To listen and consider other opinions

The guidelines provide a sequence of graduated consequences for students whose behaviour and/or iPad use disrupts their own or other students’ learning environment. Parents will be notified when their son’s behaviour in a class or number of classes is repeatedly disruptive and advised of the consequences being imposed, where such disruption becomes serious.

Appendix A: Preparatory School curriculum overview 2019

Pre-Kindergarten (PK)

Learning in the PK is guided by the Early Years Learning Framework as well as providing learning opportunities from the following specialist programs:

  • Art
  • Chinese
  • Dance and Drama
  • Library
  • Music
  • Physical Education
Kindergarten (K)

Learning in the Kindergarten is guided by the Early Years Learning Framework and Western Australian Curriculum Guidelines for Kindergarten as well as providing learning opportunities from the following specialist programs:

  • Art
  • Chinese
  • Dance and Drama
  • Library
  • Music
  • Physical Education
Pre-Primary (PP)

Whilst adhering to the Early Years Learning Framework and Western Australian Curriculum Guidelines for Pre-Primary, all students in PP study the following as part of preparation for transition to Year 1:

  • Art, year-long 2/fortnight
  • Chinese, year-long 2/fortnight
  • Dance and Drama, year-long 1/fortnight
  • Design and Digital Technologies, year-long 2/fortnight
  • English, year-long 18/fortnight
  • Physical Education, Health and Well Being and Personal & Spiritual Development, year-long 5/fortnight
  • Humanities and Social Sciences and Science, year-long 6/fortnight
  • Mathematics, year-long 10/fortnight
  • Music, year-long 2/fortnight
Year 1

Whilst adhering to the principles of the Early Years Learning Framework, all students in Year 1 study the following:

  • Art, year-long 3/fortnight
  • Chinese, year-long 2/fortnight
  • Dance and Drama, year-long 1/fortnight
  • Design and Digital Technologies, year-long 4/fortnight
  • English, year-long 18/fortnight
  • Physical Education, Health and Well Being and Personal & Spiritual Development, year-long 6/fortnight
  • Humanities and Social Sciences, year-long 6/fortnight
  • Mathematics, year-long 10/fortnight
  • Music, year-long 2/fortnight
  • Science, year-long 4/fortnight
Year 2

Whilst adhering to the principles of the Early Years Learning Framework, all students in Year 2 study the following:

  • Art, year-long 3/fortnight
  • Chinese, year-long 2/fortnight
  • Dance and Drama, year-long 1/fortnight
  • Design and Digital Technologies, year-long 4/fortnight
  • English, year-long 18/fortnight
  • Physical Education, Health and Well Being and Personal & Spiritual Development, year-long 6/fortnight
  • Humanities and Social Sciences, year-long 6/fortnight
  • Mathematics, year-long 10/fortnight
  • Music, year-long 2/fortnight
  • Science, year-long 4/fortnight
Year 3

All students in Year 3 study the following:

  • Art, year-long 3/fortnight
  • Chinese, year-long 2/fortnight
  • Dance and Drama, year-long 2/fortnight
  • Design and Digital Technologies, year-long 2/fortnight
  • English, year-long 16/fortnight
  • Physical Education, Health and Well Being and Personal & Spiritual Development, year-long 5/fortnight
  • Humanities and Social Sciences, year-long 6/fortnight
  • Mathematics, year-long 10/fortnight
  • Music, year-long 2/fortnight
  • Science, year-long 4/fortnight
Year 4

All students in Year 4 study the following:

  • Art, year-long 3/fortnight
  • Chinese, year-long 2/fortnight
  • Dance and Drama, year-long 2/fortnight
  • Design and Digital Technologies, year-long 2/fortnight
  • English, year-long 16/fortnight
  • Physical Education, Health and Well Being and Personal & Spiritual Development, year-long 5/fortnight
  • Humanities and Social Sciences, year-long 6/fortnight
  • Mathematics, year-long 10/fortnight
  • Music, year-long 2/fortnight
  • Science, year-long 4/fortnight
 Year 5

All students in Year 5 study the following:

  • Art, year-long 3/fortnight
  • Chinese, year-long 2/fortnight
  • Dance and Drama, year-long 2/fortnight
  • Design and Digital Technologies, year-long 2/fortnight
  • English, year-long 16/fortnight
  • Physical Education, Health and Well Being and Personal & Spiritual Development, year-long 5/fortnight
  • Humanities and Social Sciences, year-long 6/fortnight
  • Mathematics, year-long 10/fortnight
  • Music, year-long 2/fortnight
  • Science, year-long 4/fortnight
 Year 6

All students in Year 6 study the following:

  • Art, year-long 3/fortnight
  • Chinese, year-long 2/fortnight
  • Dance and Drama, year-long 2/fortnight
  • Design and Digital Technologies, year-long 2/fortnight
  • English, year-long 16/fortnight
  • Physical Education, Health and Well Being and Personal & Spiritual Development, year-long 5/fortnight
  • Humanities and Social Sciences, year-long 6/fortnight
  • Mathematics, year-long 10/fortnight
  • Music, year-long 2/fortnight
  • Science, year-long 4/fortnight

Appendix B: Senior School curriculum overview 2019

The following summary outlines the subjects that will be studied by boys in 2019. Each subject is annotated with the following:

  • Year-long, semester, or trimester: This specifies how long the course runs for. If it runs for a semester or trimester, it may run at a different semester/trimester for each boy.
  • Periods per fortnight: This specifies how many periods in a fortnight will be spent in class for this subject, assuming no public holidays or excursions.
  • ‘Or’ subjects listed in italics: These subjects are alternatives that specific students will study in lieu of the listed subject. These alternatives are offered to students who would benefit from an alternative program of study, as outlined in the Curriculum Policy.
Year 7

All students in Year 7 study the following:

  • Chinese, French or Japanese, year-long 6/fortnight  or Curriculum Support or EALD
  • Design & Technology, semester 5/fortnight
  • Digital Thinking, semester 5/fortnight
  • Drama, semester 5/fortnight
  • English, year-long 8/fortnight  or English Support
  • Humanities, year-long 7/fortnight  or Intensive Reading Program
  • Mathematics, year-long 7/fortnight  or Mathematics Support or Mathematics Enrichment
  • Music, semester 5/fortnight or Music Extension
  • Personal & Spiritual Development, semester 5/fortnight
  • Physical Education, year-long 4/fortnight
  • Science, year-long 7/fortnight  or Science Support
  • Visual Arts, semester 5/fortnight
Year 8

All students in Year 8 study the following:

  • Chinese, French or Japanese, year-long 6/fortnight  or Curriculum Support
  • Design & Technology, semester 5/fortnight
  • Digital Thinking, semester 5/fortnight
  • Drama, semester 5/fortnight
  • English, year-long 8/fortnight  or English Support / Extension or EALD
  • Humanities, year-long 7/fortnight  or Humanities Support / Extension
  • Mathematics, year-long 7/fortnight  or Mathematics Support / Extension
  • Music, semester 5/fortnight or Music Extension
  • Personal & Spiritual Development, semester 5/fortnight
  • Physical Education, year-long 4/fortnight
  • Science, year-long 7/fortnight  or Science Support / Extension or Intensive Reading Program
  • Visual Arts, semester 5/fortnight
Year 9

All students in Year 9 study the following:

  • English, year-long 8/fortnight  or English Support / Extension or EALD
  • Humanities or Humanities Support / Extension
    • Commerce, trimester 7/fortnight
    • Geography, trimester 7/fortnight
    • History, trimester 7/fortnight
  • Mathematics, year-long 8/fortnight  or Mathematics Support / Extension
  • Personal & Spiritual Development, semester 6/fortnight
  • Physical Education, year-long 6/fortnight
  • Science:  or Science Support / Extension
    • Biology, trimester 7/fortnight
    • Chemistry, trimester 7/fortnight
    • Physics, trimester 7/fortnight

All students also select five units of electives, comprising a mix of:

  • 2 unit electives that run for a whole year, year-long 6/fortnight
  • 1 unit electives that run for half the year, semester 6/fortnight
Year 10

All students in Year 10 study the following:

  • English, year-long 8/fortnight  or English Support / Extension or EALD
  • Humanities:  or Humanities Support / Extension
    • Commerce, trimester 8/fortnight
    • Geography, trimester 8/fortnight
    • History, trimester 8/fortnight
  • Mathematics Mainstream or Advanced, year-long 8/fortnight  or Support / Extension
  • Personal & Spiritual Development, year-long 6/fortnight
  • Physical Education, year-long 4/fortnight
  • Science:  or Science Support / Extension
    • Biology, trimester 8/fortnight
    • Chemistry, trimester 8/fortnight
    • Physics, trimester 8/fortnight

All students also select two electives:

  • Elective 1, year-long 6/fortnight
  • Elective 2, year-long 6/fortnight

 

 

Year 11 (all courses are year-long*)

All students study six timetabled subjects:

  • English, Literature or EALD, 8/fortnight
  • Five other subjects, 8/fortnight
  • Physical Education, 4/fortnight
  • Assessment period Wednesday P4, 2/fortnight

* See the Reporting and Assessment Policy for details pertaining to the change of subjects mid-year.

 

Year 12  (all courses are year-long)

All students study six timetabled subjects:

  • English, Literature or EALD, 8/fortnight
  • Five other subjects, 8/fortnight
  • Private study can be a subject (if on an ATAR Pathway), 8/fortnight
  • Physical Education, 2/fortnight
  • Unallocated, 2/fortnight
  • Assessment period Thursday P4, 2/fortnight

Appendix C: International exchange program

A number of students, predominantly in Year 10, participate in the ‘Beyond Queenslea Drive’ (BQD) program, co-ordinated by the Director of Activities (DoA).

The procedures relating to this exchange are detailed below.

Incoming students

Visiting boys who are at CCGS less than five weeks are classified as short-stay and boys who are here more than five weeks are classified as long-stay.

  • The DoA meets with all BQD exchange boys once per week.
  • The process by which exchange students are placed in classes is as follows:
  • Short-stay boys are not offered a choice in their timetable.
    • Short-stay boys and long-stay boys will, where possible, shadow their hosts. However, considerations such as class sizes and ‘best fit’ may mean that this is not possible in all subjects for all boys.
    • DoA will negotiate elective choices with long-stay boys prior to their arrival and advise the Assistant Director of Studies accordingly.
    • DoA will email staff with details of boys’ timetables, dates of stay, home school and name of buddy in advance of their arrival, as far as is possible.
    • DoA will also email boys’ parents with timetables in advance and suggest that boys bring some work with them to complete whilst at Christ Church.
    • The goal is to ensure that boys’ timetables are settled in advance of their arrival so that teachers are advised in advance that they will be joining the class.

Class lists and attendance

  • Normal processes should be followed. Teachers mark the roll as usual and Heads of House will follow up on absentees as for CCGS boys.

Academic expectations

  • Boys should primarily be involved in the academic work being completed at the host school; however, where this is clearly not relevant or possible (e.g. in Languages), they should engage in work provided by their own school or in a project of some sort e.g. blog.
  • Whilst it may at times be difficult to cater for boys in a meaningful way in practical subjects, the suggestion is that practical subject teachers make available a simple, scaled-down version of the task; the guest could also work with host, assisting.

Reporting

  • Where the student is a long-term exchange student (approximately one term) an academic report will be provided by the Director of Activities. Tutors and boarding year co-ordinators also provide reports where appropriate.

Length of stay

  • This is set by the overseas schools.

Size of program (these numbers are approximate)

  • BQD – generally four to six at one time
  • Japanese (biennial) – 20
  • Chinese (3.5 weeks) – 10
  • French – alternates with Japanese.
  • Cultural exchanges – Hong Kong – 10 boys for up to one week.

Outgoing students

Academic work

  • We encourage a balance of staying in contact with CCGS academic work and being fully immersed in the host school program and the new environment in which the student finds himself. Boys take iPads and can email staff while away.
  • Decisions about awarding of prizes in Year 10 are made by the Head of Department, who will take absence on exchange into consideration.

Teacher responsibility

  • Where feasible, provide suitable classwork for a student on exchange.
  • Where reasonable, maintain email contact with the student while he is on exchange, including work samples, assignments and assessments the class has completed. There is no suggestion the student will be ‘taught online’, or that the student will complete assessments or assignments sent electronically.

Student responsibility

  • Students should contact all teachers at least two weeks prior to departure to notify them of the dates that they will be away and request any suitable work for this time.
  • Students should fully involve themselves in all learning opportunities in the host school, but also where time and place permits, complete work set as suggested by CCGS staff.
  • BQD students are also encouraged to use their time in the host school/country to complete an investigative project into a current or historical issue.

Parent responsibility

  • Parents need to be aware that some staff and departments may set some work, and stay in email contact with the exchange student while he is overseas, but that, as outlined above, the student cannot be ‘taught online’.
  • Encourage the student to work hard before he goes, and on return, to minimise the problems that may occur from missed work.

Appendix D: Guidelines for development of Teaching Strategies Profiles (TSPs) and Learning Profiles (LPs)

Communication with parents

The process commences with a meeting with parents to discuss the documentation and what the contents of a TSP/LP may include, if one is required. All TSPs/LPs must be sent to parents and parents must have the opportunity to respond before the TSP/LP is placed in DocMan.

In some cases, an initial meeting might not be required – in such cases, email communication would be appropriate in lieu of a meeting. (A function on the Synergetic TSP/LP will be added to record the date at which it was sent to parents, to ensure that we are accountable to the fact that it has been seen.)

  • All TSPs and LPs need to be reviewed in Term 4, for students from Year 6 in the Preparatory School.
  • Where possible, TSPs/LPs should be reviewed in January, for new Year 7s new to CCGS. This will only be possible if all documentation has been provided.

TSP/LP review

  • TSPs and LPs are to be reviewed every 2-3 years.
  • “Last review date” field has been added to the TSP/LP page to manage this.

Laptop use

No provisions for laptop use will be given to any student (regardless of OT report) until they have been assessed by the CCGS Psychologists’ Office.

 Special Provisions

To ensure that the special provisions list and the TSP/LP are consistent, special provisions are not recorded on the TSP/LP. Instead, this data will be drawn from the special provisions data. Recording it in only one place ensures that there are no contradictions.

 Process for notifications of Special Provisions

  1. School Psych emails Studies Office to advise of planned special accommodation
  2. Studies Office reviews and approves
  3. Studies Office advises SO EA
  4. SO EA adds to list on Synergetic
  5. SO EA emails student and teachers.

TSPs for EAL/D students

The EAL/D Coordinator is responsible for preparing Teaching Strategies Profiles for students whose English is an additional language or dialect. These profiles plot the student’s acquisition of English against SCSA’s progress maps in four domains: Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking. They are available to staff and parents via the parent portal and will be updated on an annual basis.

Appendix E: Individual Education Programs (IEPs) in individual subject/s

Identification

The process of identifying students who require an IEP in individual subject/s will be as follows:

  • The student should have an existing Learning Profile, reflecting a learning disability, or other compelling evidence of disadvantage, and be in a support class
  • There should be sustained evidence that he is unable to make progress in the subject, which is not related to work ethic
  • In practice, the above means that a student is achieving a CCGS E grade in the lowest level of a course available, and that no level of effort would be sufficient for him to be able to achieve a CCGS D grade or better, because of significant gaps in his skills and understandings
  • Where possible, the identification process should occur as part of case management review: in Term 4 for implementation in Semester 1 the following year; and in Term 2 for implementation in Semester 2 of the same year.

Process and format

  • Initially, written approval must be sought from the Director of Studies to begin the process of an IEP for each student
  • Secondly, parents should be contacted to ascertain their permission for their son to work to an IEP. Parents should also be given the Curriculum Policy, which outlines the implications of being on an IEP and this process
  • Once parents (or their nominees) have given written consent, the IEP will be negotiated between:
    • the teacher of the subject
    • the Head of Department (or delegate)
    • the co-ordinator of the LDC
    • Where required: the case manager, the School Psychologist
  • The IEP will contain details of:
    • objectives for the semester, with reference to AC, specific year group and specific skills targeted for each
    • required strategy/resources and details of learning activities: text references showing appropriate text book and chapter, for example, will be very helpful
    • personnel responsible for implementation
    • mechanisms for monitoring progress.
  • The student will be set measurable targets aligned to the Australian Curriculum but at an appropriate level for the student; these will generally be of a considerably lower level than other students in the class
  • The targets will be based on feedback from recent, appropriate testing data as overseen by HoD or delegate and should be aligned with existing available IEP targets for the subject area, where possible
  • Once the targets have been set, parents will be advised of the recommended targets and will be invited to make suggestions as appropriate
  • The Studies Office will be responsible for final approval and will oversee appropriate set-up for reporting
  • The final IEP will then be uploaded to Docman by the co-ordinator of the LDC.

Targets, implementation and reporting

  • The targets are designed to be clear, achievable and measure goals. For example: “Is able to read a train timetable and consider options for planning a journey”
  • At the end of each term, the teacher will rate each outcome along the scale attached (see next page)
  • The same set of IEP targets will be used for the following term
  • At the end of Term 2/4, the IEP targets will be reviewed for the next semester
  • Assessment of skills and understandings will be at the teacher’s discretion and could be ascertained through a number of measures including: verbally, through 1:1 interaction, via a computerised exercise, via written work. Students should not sit a common test with the rest of the class when following a IEP
  • A separate assessment record will need to be kept electronically. This should be shared with the co-ordinator of the LDC and/or case manager on a regular basis

Teaching and resourcing

  • The teacher will provide learning opportunities for the student to progress towards these targets
  • The teacher is primarily responsible for the student and needs to ensure that time is dedicated to the teaching of these students; this responsibility must not be delegated to EAs who may be allocated to the class; the EA can assist across the whole class
  • The teacher will need to collaborate with the Co-ordinator of the LDC and HoD or delegate for assistance in the creation of appropriate teaching resources.

Reporting

  • At the end of each term, the teacher will rate each outcome along the scale below
  • When reports are issued, these ratings will be included on the report instead of course mark, grade and work practices.
  • The case manager or co-ordinator of the LDC will review the report before it is issued to parents
  • The IEP report will be integrated into the usual report.
Achievement Levels – Individual Education Program
Emerging

 

Demonstrates awareness of the skill or response that is required but is heavily reliant on prompts and cues.
Developing

 

Understanding is more developed but is still reliant on prompts and cues to complete the task or demonstrate the skill.
Consolidating

 

Task can be completed in familiar contexts with minimal prompts or cues.
Achieved

 

Skill can be demonstrated and task completed in different contexts without any cues or prompting.

Appendix F – Year 11 Mathematics: Methods

The Mathematics: Methods course is set at a challenging level and is significantly more difficult than Mathematics: Applications. Our experience is that a number of boys select Methods without being aware of its level of difficulty and this leads to problems, especially when boys want to drop to Applications and there is no more room in these classes. Boys who do not reach the advised cut-off, but still wish to study Methods, have the opportunity to consolidate and extend their skills over the summer break by working through a relevant textbook which is made available to them.  Boys are not precluded from studying Mathematics: Methods, and the additional study during the summer break works well in preparing the boys for the demands of the Year 11 course.

Appendix G – Students who speak English as an additional Language or Dialect

Christ Church has a long tradition of educating boys for whom English is an Additional Language or Dialect (EAL/D). Some of these students come from remote regions of Australia and others come from countries all around the world.

The student’s wellbeing is our first and foremost consideration when making decisions about the entry and instruction of an EAL/D boy. Christ Church has a high standard of academic excellence and therefore students require a satisfactory level of proficiency in English before enrolling at the School. Christ Church provides specialist EAL/D classes across Years 7 – 12, however, the School is not an intensive language centre.

As part of the application process, the School must be provided with all relevant information regarding possible learning difficulties, and students must undertake an English assessment test by an organisation such as Australian Education Assessment Services. A place at the School is conditional on reaching the required standard prior to enrolment. For this reason, we require mandatory re-testing by AEAS before final enrolment, the results of which are used to ensure optimal placement of students in regard to year level and choice of subjects. Their rate of progress once they are at the school, as with other students, is largely dependent upon their motivation and capacity.

At the time of enrolment, the School must be provided with all relevant information regarding possible learning difficulties so that we can make valid judgements about whether we can provide students with the support they require.

In order to best enable the School to support EAL/D students, they are usually admitted in Terms 1 and 3 only.